Appaloosa spotting - big spots

Some Appaloosas have exceptionally large dark spots on their white patterned areas.

Most of the time, these horses are black. They also do not show signs of having any non-Appaloosa white face or leg markings.

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Non-Appaloosa spotting

Some horses have spotting that may be mistaken for Appaloosa spotting, yet is caused by some other mechanism.

Some of the most common non-Appaloosa spots are Birdcatcher, Bend Or, Chubari and Sabino roan.

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Appaloosa spotting - repigmentation specks

Appaloosa skin goes through changes over time. Often areas that were totally white at birth develop small pigmented specks as the horse ages.

These are easiest to see on horses with fairly extensive white patterning, and can occur on spotted and fewspotted individuals.

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Appaloosa spotting - snowball spots

Some Appaloosas are born with rounded splotches of white patterning that are randomly spread over the body. Unlike snowflake roaning, these are present at birth, but they may intensify and enlarge as the horse matures.

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Unusual patterning - brindle

The word "brindle" refers to a type of patterning in which an animal shows alternating light and dark vertical stripes of colouration.

These photos show examples that may have differing causes. They have been grouped together by common aspects of appearance only.

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LP-caused traits

In this article, we'll deal with LP-caused eye, skin and hoof characteristics at various levels of expression.

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Unusual changes to Appaloosa spots

Some Appaloosa-patterned horses and ponies develop unusual changes in their spots as they age.

These horses are not going grey, they are developing what many refer to as 'moldy spots'.

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